Chiquita

Bird ID: D2016036
Species: Cockatiel
Sex: Female
Sub-Species: Lutino
Health Status: Special Needs
Good with Kids: Unknown
Well Socialized: Unknown
Adoption Status: Foster on 2019-02-10

My Sponsors: Sponsor Me!

If you're approved to adopt, click here to email my adoption coordinator.
To learn more about fostering or adopting our birds, please click here.


Hi, I`m Chiquita, a gorgeous female lutino cockatiel with a story that`s a bit sad but all too common.

My previous human companion surrendered me to a veterinary hospital because I`d been laying a lot of eggs and had developed some medical problems as a result. My owner liked to handle and cuddle me and I thought that this felt really nice, but all that cuddling helped stimulate myu hormones and almost certainly contributed to my chronic egg laying. To phrase this in terms of an object lesson, please don`t `cuddle` your birds, and limit your petting to the neck and up.

Anyway, all of the egg-laying led to progressively softer bones, which led to a fracture of my left wing bone (which, by way of edifaction is called a humeral but is not at all funny to me at the moment). I just went to an avian veterinarian -- again -- because there`s concern that my wing might be so uncomfortable that it should be amputated. The vet said that he first needs to run a CT scan and assess my bone density.

So that`s where I am at the moment. Oh, I have some arthritis in my legs too and my back is not in great shape because of some falls. The good news is that I`ve stopped laying eggs, am on a good diet, and love playing with my toys in a bird-safe playpen. My favorites are balsa blocks, which I like to chew into wooden confetti.

For all the handling I got in my previous home, I never learned to step onto a finger. I`ll let my foster mom scoop me up though. I`m good with people and my foster mom says that I`m a gentle, older bird (the vet says I`m about nine years old.)

As soon as my medical needs are stabilized a little more, I`d like to go to a home with gentle people and another older cockatiel or two to while away the time with. `m just looking for a place where I can be safe and feel comfortable. Thanks for reading about me!

In nature, cockatiels live in large flocks. A single bird in a cage spends much of his/her life being lonely because humans have things they must do that take them away. We therefore will only adopt a single cockatiel to a household if there is already at least one cockatiel living there. Otherwise, cockatiels must be adopted in groups of two or more.